reviews
When Gravity Fails (Marid Audran #1) by George Alec Effinger Book Review
06, Jan

4.5/5

WHEN GRAVITY FAILS by George Alec Effinger is one of the seminal works of science fiction but, sadly, has fallen out of reading order for a lot of modern fans. Which is a sham because it does belong there with Neuromancer, Snow Crash, Hardwired, and Synners. It still has a lot of respect but is something that should probably come up more. It is dark, gritty, imaginative, and presents a vision of the future that not only remains internally consistent but socially relevant. Has it aged 100% well? Not entirely, no, but better than a lot of other fiction from the Eighties.

Leviathan Falls (The Expanse #9) by James S.A. Corey Book Review
01, Jan

4.5/5

LEVIATHAN FALLS is the final installment of the Expanse series and an overall satisfying one. We've been through the Rocinante's adventures past numerous events like the Protomolecule, Ringates, devastation of Earth at the hands of Marco Inaros, and then the rise of Laconia. We finally get a resolution to the plot of the Goths, though, and dealing with a foe that is so far above humanity that they wiped out a race who was already millions of years more advanced than mankind.

The Machine Killer (Cyberpunk City #1) by D.L. Young Book Review
08, Dec

4.5/5

CYBERPUNK CITY: THE MACHINE KILLER is a cyberpunk thriller that I very much enjoyed. As anyone who knows me can attest, I am a huge fan of cyberpunk. Almost as much as I am of vampires. There's no vampires here but unlike the undead, the cyberpunk genre has a dearth of books being put out every year. So I was very happy to find a series that would make use of all the tropes of the near future dystopias envisioned by William Gibson, Mike Pondsmith, Ridley Scott, and Bruce Sterling. If you were left with an unsatisfied craving after the mixed results of Cyberpunk 2077 then I'm happy to recommend this work.

Super (Superhero Novels for Adults #1) by Ernie Lindsey
20, Nov

4.5/5

There's a lot of superhero novels out there but only rarely as they any good. I say this as someone who writes superhero novels that are clearly the greatest thing ever written. Still, I absolutely love prose superhero fiction and I was recommended this novel by my good friend Steve Caldwell (The Bookwyrm Reads). He said that I would absolutely love this novel and, you know what, he was right. I guess I owe him a coke.

Starship's Mage (Starship's Mage #1) by Glynn Stewart Book Review
20, Oct

4.5/5

STARSHIP'S MAGE is a book that has been sitting on my Kindle for some time and I am kicking myself for not reading it sooner. It is a book that I strongly recommend on the basis of simply being a fun read that provides a simple but consistent space opera setting. I have some issues with the book (technically omnibus of four novellas) but it is, overall, one of the better things you can pick up on Kindle Unlimited.

Sabbat: The Black Hand (Vampire: The Masquerade) by Renegade Game Studios
25, Sep

4/5

SABBAT: THE BLACK HAND is the latest supplement to come out for Vampire: The Masquerade Fifth Edition as well as the first to come from new license holder Renegade Games Studios. The Sabbat have long been one of the three bedrocks of the setting with the other two (The Camarilla and Anarchs) having their own supplements. The fact the Sabbat did not have a supplement before now and were left conspicuously undetailed has been a source of controversy among the fandom. Even more so with the revelation that, even in this book, they would be regulated to NPC antagonists rather than player characters as have been available since 1992.

Poor Man's Fight (Poor Man's Fight #1) by Elliot Kay Book Review
04, Sep

4/5

POOR MAN'S FIGHT is an interesting military science fiction story that takes several well-trodden tropes and proceeds to go in some surprising directions with them. Rarely am I ever surprised by a book but this managed to pull off a few twists and turns I did not see coming. It's an interesting combination of Starship Troopers, Die Hard, a pirate story, and a coming of age tale all in one. One that I heartily recommend to those who are interested in space based stories with a focus more on people than science or action.

Mindfracked (Cassidy #1) by M.R. Forbes Book Review
09, Aug

4.5/5

MINDFRACKED by M.R Forbes is a cyberpunk spy thriller that involves a body-switching science fiction consciousness named Cassidy. Cassidy is a Shade, a secret agent of a department called Unity that sends them out on highly covert missions that will end after they finish their 50th case. It is a group with a policy of absolutely no loose ends and that includes killing anyone who is even slightly aware of the group's existence. Cassidy thinks he has it all figured out but soon discovers that he doesn't know nearly as much as he thinks.

The House of the Rising Gun (Easytown #4) by Brian Parker Book Review
06, Aug

4/5

THE HOUSE OF THE RISING GUN by Brian Parker is the fourth installment of the Easytown series that I an exceptionally fond of. The premise is in the near-future, New Orleans has regained its reputation as a place of debauchery with a cyberpunk twist. If you want to be robot, cyborg, or human prostitutes then this is the place for it. Designer drugs and virtual reality fantasies are alongside the more traditional stuff. Detective Zach Forrest has Easytown as his beat and struggles to stay ahead of the high tech crimes he often finds himself dealing with.

Halfhearted Hunter (False Icons #3) by Rick Gualtieri and R.E. Carr Book Review
31, Jul

4.5/5

HALF-HEARTED HUNTER is the third installment of the False Icons series that is, itself, a spin off of the Tome of Bill franchise. It is a bit hard to get into onto its own and a lot of the in-jokes will fall flat if you're not a die-hard Rick Gualtieri fan but I find the series to be even more entertaining than the original one. The premise is, simply put, Jessie Flores is the Chosen One and thoroughly screws it up to an almost titanic level. It might be literally titanic as she ends up working for Uranus halfway through. I feel the series has benefited from the aid of R.E. Carr and this helps provide a feminine perspective that some of his other books lack.