reviews
Assaph

Assaph

Assaph has been a bibliophile since he learnt to read at the age of five, and a Romanophile ever since he first got his hands on Asterix, way back in elementary school. This exacerbated when his parents took him on a trip to Rome and Italy - he whinged horribly when they dragged him to "yet another church with baby angels on the ceiling", yet was happy to skip all day around ancient ruins and museums for Etruscan art. 

He has since been feeding his addiction for books with stories of mystery and fantasy of all kinds. A few years ago he randomly picked a copy of a Lindsay Davis' Marcus Didius Falco novel in a used book fair, and fell in love with Rome all over again, this time from the view-point of a cynical adult. His main influences in writing are Steven Saylor, Lindsey Davis, Barry Hughart and Boris Akunin. 

Assaph now lives in Sydney, Australia with his wife, kids, cats, and - this being Australia - assorted spiders. By day he is a software product manager, bridging the gap between developers and users, and by night he's writing - he seems to do his best writing after midnight.

Website: http://egretia.com

Facebook: http://facebook.com/AssaphMehrAuthor

Twitter: @assaphmehr

Battle Ground (The Dresden Files #17) by Jim Butcher - Book Review 10, Oct

I've read the first half of this story (see my review of Peace Talks) back in July, and of course I jumped straight into this novel as soon as it came out.

Forgotten Peoples of the Ancient World by Philip Matyszak - Book Review 18, Sep

Matyszak is one of my favourite popular historians (because archaeologists and historians are much more deserving of celebrity culture than actual celebrities), and I loved previous books of his. This books offers a review of people and nations you've probably heard of in passing, and promises to give you a deeper understanding of those forgotten people and their impact on later generations.