reviews
Natasha

Natasha

Natasha's passion for reading was kindled by her parents and the local library that allowed her family to checkout 50 books at a time. She first fell in love with fantasy through Arthurian retellings whereas her love for science fiction began with Star Wars novels. Nowadays, she still spends her free time reading but also gaming, running a blog (natrosette), and obsessing over TV shows. Maybe if she spent as much time reading as she does looking for books to read, she'd actually make a dent in her TBR.

The Keeper of Night (The Keeper of Night #1) by Kylie Lee Baker - Book Review 02, Nov

Half British Reaper, half Japanese Shinigami, Ren has lived over a century in London collecting human souls. She’s despised by her fellow Reapers for her heritage and denounced by her father, with only her younger brother by her side. When her Shinigami powers grow difficult to control, she flees to Japan, hoping to find her mother and the acceptance she’s never had. But the Japanese underworld is dangerous and unfamiliar, and The Goddess of Death is not eager to accept her as one of her own.

A Neon Darkness (The Bright Sessions #2) by Lauren Shippen - Book Review 01, Nov

Robert always gets what he wants because he makes those around him want it too. It’s an ability that should make his life easy and blissful, should give him anything and everything. And yet, arriving in Las Angeles soon before his 19th birthday, he brings nothing but a haunted past. But he meets people, people he thinks could be his friends, who might actually understand him. If only he’s willing to give up control.

Flesh Eater (Houndstooth #1) by Travis Riddle - Book Review 19, Jan

After how much I enjoyed (SPFBO 6 semi-finalist) Spit and Song by Travis Riddle, I was excited for the chance to read his newest novel Flesh Eater, which is the beginning of the Houndstooth trilogy. This series takes place in a new world in which the characters are sentient animals (think Redwall) but retains the unique world-building and adventurous tone that I loved so much in Spit and Song and have come to expect from Riddle's writing.