reviews
Natasha

Natasha

Natasha's passion for reading was kindled by her parents and the local library that allowed her family to checkout 50 books at a time. She first fell in love with fantasy through Arthurian retellings whereas her love for science fiction began with Star Wars novels. Nowadays, she still spends her free time reading but also gaming, running a blog (natrosette), and obsessing over TV shows. Maybe if she spent as much time reading as she does looking for books to read, she'd actually make a dent in her TBR.

The Original by Brandon Sanderson and Mary Robinette Kowal - Book Review 22, Apr

The Original is a fast-paced and entertaining sci-fi thriller, best consumed in one sitting. If you like your audiobooks to go the extra mile, with sound effects and tense music at the appropriate moments, then I'm sure you'll very much enjoy this audio production, though for me, as someone who always listens to audiobooks sped up, it mostly just got in the way.

Spear by Nicola Griffith - Book Review 31, Mar

Spear is the story of a young girl raised by her mother alone in the woods, who knows destiny is before her and hears the lake calling to her, knows she must find her way to Artos' court. It's excellent retelling of sorts; I really enjoyed my time with this. The writing is beautiful, and the setting vivid. The story was given exactly the length it needed.

The Way Spring Arrives and Other Stories: A Collection of Chinese Science Fiction and Fantasy in Translation from a Visionary Team of Female and Nonbinary Creators - Book Review 19, Mar

The Way Spring Arrives and Other Stories is a collection of translated Chinese SFF from female and nonbinary creators. I was really looking forward to picking this one up and was in no way disappointed. The prose throughout this collection was stunning; you can tell that every bit of it was carefully considered. The audiobook was also well-done and I particularly appreciated hearing the pronunciation of the Chinese words used, such as in the essays on translation. Speaking of which, the nonfiction essays explaining different aspects of the relationships between gender, translation, and Chinese literature were by far my favorite part of this collection. Not only were they intriguing and informative on their own, but they also enhanced my enjoyment of the stories themselves.