reviews
Max

Max

Max’s passion for fantastic stories began with weekly trips to the comic book store as a child. Now an English teacher at a boarding school, he is always reading. Max has written for sites like Geeks of Doom and SF Signal, where he created the Indie Author Spotlight. Max lives in Connecticut with his wife – who graciously embraces his need to display action figures all over the house – and daughter, who is inheriting her parents’ affinity for books. 

Dead Jack and the Soul Catcher (Dead Jack #2) by James Aquilone - Book Review 04, Jun

Zombies and pixies and skeletons, oh my! No, these aren’t what you’d discover in a strange direct-to-dvd sequel to The Wizard of Oz; these are just some of the supernatural and fantasy creatures that hilariously grace the pages of the Dead Jack series. In Dead Jack and the Soul Catcher by James Aquilone, it’s up to Dead Jack – the drug-addicted private detective – and his band of misfits to save Pandemonium once again, and perhaps, learn a bit about himself in the process.

Thrawn (Star Wars: Thrawn #1) by Timothy Zahn - Book Review 27, May

I love the Star Wars universe; it’s expansive and full of countless possibilities and potential. I do, however, have to be honest: I haven’t watched all of the shows (though I’m currently making my way through The Clone Wars) and I’ve only read a handful of the novels from the Expanded Universe, or what is now called Star Wars Legends; and, unfortunately, the original Thrawn trilogy is not included in that handful. With that being said, I’ve been curious about the character of Thrawn and thought it time to find out why so many fans of the Legends brand were thrilled to see him make the crossover to canon. Now that I’m finished with Thrawn by Timothy Zahn – and longing to read its sequel, Thrawn: Alliances – I fully understand the appeal.

The Wolves of Winter by Tyrell Johnson - Book Review 17, May

“Grief never goes away. It just changes. At first it’s like molten-hot lava dripping from your heart and hollowing you from the inside. Over time, it settles into your bones, your skin, so that you live with it, walk with it every day. Grief isn’t the footprints in the snow. It’s the empty spaces between.”