Displaying items by tag: Adrian Tchaikovsky
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Wizards, Warriors, & Words is a fantasy writing advice podcast, jointly hosted by Jed HerneRob J. HayesMichael R. Fletcher, and Dyrk Ashton. New episodes release every Monday on BookNest, YouTube, and all podcast platforms. Enjoy!

Arthur C. Clark award-winning author Adrian Tchaikovsky (Children of Time, Shadows of the Apt, The Doors of Eden) joins the Wizards, Warriors, and Words team to share his secrets for writing fantasy and sci-fi animals.

 

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Children of Time (Children of Time #1) by Adrian Tchaikovsky - Book Review 08, Aug

"That is the problem with ignorance. You can never truly know the extent of what you are ignorant about."

Children of Time is my first delving into the genre of science fiction, and it served as a great introduction. When I began, I found it a bit mind-boggling because of the technical space language and sophisticated technology. But as the story progressed, I soon acclimatised to this aspect and it did not become as demanding or distracting as I first thought.

There were some wonderfully unique aspects to this book, which I have been told cannot be compared to any other sci-fi, because of how different it is. One such idea is exploring evolution, and following the journey of this natural progression with different animals, in this case a number of insect species... It was so fun and novel that it cemented itself as my favourite part of the book.

"Humanity is overated'

It took a while to get into the human PoV, who was on a spaceship that carries the survivors of humanity. This was partly due to the technical part that I mentioned earlier, and also there was not much action to begin with. But when the plot started rolling, this storyline was also fantastic, because of the cultural challenges presented, the fantastic prose, the unique ideas, and many other reasons.

There is a very small cast of characters, which is extremely different to the large scale war band worthy cast. But it served well to strengthen the bonds with the characters that were present, and added another level of depth as more page time was dedicated to these people.

"A life lived entirely at the whim of another is no life at all."

Tchaikovsky's prose is very clever, as it changes depending on what PoV he is with and the characteristics of the person whose perspective he is following. The writing with the spiders is masterful as they become more intelligent due to evolution along with the prose.

The plot cleverly intertwines and separates the PoV's with a steady development that consistently increases the tension until the pivotal climax that was completely unguessable! It was clever, made sense, was intriguing, and had many different aspects. Cannot ask for much more than that really.

So once again, Children of Time was a great introduction to the genre, and I am sure that I will continue onto its sequel at some point, along with other science fiction. So, thank you Adrian!

4.5/5 Stars

Children of Time 30, Oct

Rating: 4/5 Stars

Smart and imaginative, highly recommended for everyone who loves Sci-Fi and not recommended for anyone with arachnophobia.