reviews

Blue Prometheus

Write on: Tue, 28 Aug 2018 by  in SPFBO 2018 Be the first to comment! Read 1474

Blue Prometheus by Ned Marcus  Blue Prometheus is a fantasy adventure initially set in our modern times. It begins with a pair of humans who have no knowledge of magic, when a craft from another world drops into the middle of riots in Clapton Pond in London. The two main characters, Thomas and Lucy, are friends who believe they were in the wrong place at the wrong time when they are informed by a mysterious being aboard the strange ship that they are needed to come and save another world.They are the prophesied Bright Ones.

 

The fate of their own homeworld of Earth rests on their success or failure. Humanity’s hold on Prometheus is sparse compared to the wild forests which cover most of the cold planet with sentient and ferocious fauna and flora. Thomas and Lucy must learn a new language, and come to accept the wild magic of the planet to help the Silvan resistance fighters led by their guide Aina. Prometheus is being absorbed into a power-hungry monarchy which lays claim to the planet, and its vast amount of resources.The resistance knows that the planet itself may be their only ally in repulsing the mining company forcing the Silvan people from their homes. The company is backed by the vast armies, advanced tech, and armament of the empire, giving the book a SciFi vibe where magic directly goes up against technology. The wild forests of this planet may be the resistance’s only refuge from an empire that is implanting tech chips in their citizens at birth, manipulating the feelings of the people to gain power, and monitoring their moods constantly.

This is a highly imaginative book with plenty of unique settings, and a magic system similar to the relationship the indigenous population of the planet found in in the film Avatar. However, the characters aren’t very well defined and the action and the plot takes precedent. This makes their interactions feel flat and at times the dialogue seems forced. The world building of the wild flora and fauna on this strange planet take center stage in Blue Prometheus along with Aina’s mentor Orange. His knowledge and abilities allow them to succeed where otherwise they would certainly fail. Although he is fascinating, he is the deus ex machina in most of the tight spots. The wild and sentient animals of the planet, some advanced enough to communicate with a universal psychic language, are vivid and in most cases deadly. The same is true of nightmarish insects and plants that kill in imaginative ways.

Blue Prometheus is a fairly fast-paced story with a Sci-Fi feel due to the advanced tech element and interplanetary travel and is highly readable. The magic premise is centered around a metaphysical relationship to the planet’s power that most humans are unaware of. It is well written in the action scenes, however, the dialogue and character relationships could use more depth. The reader knows little to nothing of the main characters personally and they don’t develop much in this first installment. The often used word "span" in place of "spun" my disrupt the reading experience for many readers.

Blue Prometheus ends only one task for the prophesied pair of Bright Ones, while opening the continuation of the battle for freedom and the advancement of the main characters abilities in wild magic. The is no series name, but the book leaves only an open door into more adventures as this one is incomplete.

This book may appeal to a new fantasy reader that is looking for a escapist type of book with a more YA flavor. It is a discovery adventure where a band of a few determined revolutionaries go up against the might of the empire conquering their galaxy by the use of technology and black magic. 

Last modified on Tuesday, 28 August 2018 16:45
Lynn Kempner

Grimmedian. Biliophile. Reviewer. Made of Magic. Editor @ Grimmedian.com, All things Fantasy SciFi and Speculative Fiction. On a mission to keep the FAN in FANTASY.

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