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John's Reviews

John's Reviews (13)

The Slow Regard of Silent Things by Patrick Rothfus is a novella and companion tale in the Kingkiller Chronicle. The story focuses on Auri—one of Rothfuss’ most interesting side characters—and her slow regard of silent things.

The Tawny Man Trilogy (Books 7-9 in the Realm of the Elderlings Series) by Robin Hobb is the direct sequel trilogy to her Farseer Trilogy and indirect sequel to her Liveship Traders Trilogy. It is told from the perspective of FitzChivalry Farseer (now known as Tom Badgerlock) as he recounts his history in the Six Duchies. After the events of Assassin’s Quest, Fitz has retired to a quiet life with his Wit-bonded wolf Nighteyes and his adopted son, Hap. Although Starling the bard visits on occasion, his connections to Buckkeep and the Farseers have been more of less severed as the majority of his friends and family believe he is dead.

If you have not yet read The Rage of Dragons by Evan Winter, stop reading this review right now and go read it. I am dead serious. I went into this book with only a few trusted recommendations and it was a truly incredible experience. In fact, I only read the inside jacket cover after covering enough of the story to know what it was about. Had I read it too soon and it would have spoiled plot elements better left unknown. So STOP, right now, close your laptop, shut off your phone, and do whatever else you need to because the Rage of Dragons is worth. I will now continue assuming you've either already read it or have followed my advice. 

When I finished The Last Argument of Kings by Joe Abercrombie back on December 31, 2017, I was left with such a hollow feeling in my gut that I put off reading the sequel trilogy for over a year. Then when A Little Hatred was announced, I knew I needed to finally dive back into the First Law world, and I am so glad I did.

The House of Sacrifice by Anna Smith Spark is the third and final installment of the Empires of Dust Trilogy and finally answers that age old question, who would win in a fight: an entire fantasy world filled with people, magic, and dragons or one murdery boi?

The answer may surprise you.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe by C.S. Lewis is a fantasy classic. Ask any number of adult readers of fantasy what their first fantasy book was and many will list one of the Chronicles of Narnia. I don’t have statistics to back that up, but it’s a trend I’ve observed. I am no exception to this. The book was recommended to me by my third or fourth grade English teacher, and I read it reluctantly…School had taught me to hate reading. Wardrobe was the first book to really capture my imagination, forcing me to make full use of the library next door as I tore through the rest of the series with a theretofore hunger I’d never experienced. So it was with some excitement and nervousness that I revisited Narnia while reading it to my oldest son (age 5).

Erin Swan’s YA fantasy debut Bright Star follows Andra, a slave girl left mute by a traumatic event early in the story. When her master’s son is slain by assassins, she finds herself caught up in a rebellion against the corrupt government. If the rebellion is to succeed, Andra will need to find her voice, realize her potential, and become the leader Paerolia needs. Luckily, she has the help of a dragon.

The Well of Ascension is Brandon Sanderson’s second Mistborn novel and a genuinely awesome read. Following the staggering conclusion to The Final Empire, Well of Ascension picks up some time later with the city in a state of unrest. The Lord Ruler – the man believed to be god incarnate – is dead. Unfortunately, the man who masterminded the whole affair, Mistborn Murder Jesus…errr…Kelsier, is also dead. The rebuilding effort therefore has fallen into the laps of Kelsier’s protégé Vin, King Elend Venture, and the rest of Kelsier’s crew.

I began my Brandon Sanderson journey with the Way of Kings, and I haven’t had any regrets so far. Still it was a little strange moving backwards in time to the final three Wheel of Time books and now onto The Final Empire. Much like the Realm of the Elderlings books, I am playing catch up with my wife who finished the first Mistborn trilogy earlier this year. I put off reading this book for years despite having heard so many people sing it’s praises (I mean, it has 4.5 stars out of nearly 320,000 ratings on Goodreads). It’s fair to say there was a considerable amount of hype leading up to it.

It lived up to it.

Gentle reader, I will do everything in my power to limit them, but there will inevitably be some SPOILERS for Priest of Bones and Priest of Lies. Viewer discretion is advised.

“Vengeance is mine, sayeth Our Lady, and I am Her priest.”

Priest of Lies (Book #2 in the War for the Rose Throne series) picks up shortly after the end of Priest of Bones and deals with some of the fallout of that event. The power dynamic in Ellinburg has been forever changed and the town stands on the brink of war with the Skanians. Bloodhands, who readers of Priest of Bones will remember, has assumed full command of the artists formerly known as the Gutcutters and now pulls the strings on Ellinburg’s governor. This new gang, rebranded as the Northern Sons, is really the only other crew of note in Ellinburg. There are a few secondary gangs of note, but they generally support either the Pious Men or the Sons.