reviews

The Collapsing Empire (The Interdependency #1)

Write on: Sun, 22 Oct 2017 by  in Charles' Reviews Be the first to comment! Read 1214

3.5/5

THE COLLAPSING EMPIRE by John Scalzi is yet another semi-humorous space opera novel by the man who did a magnificent parody of STARSHIP TROOPERS with his OLD MAN'S WAR series. This one seems to be a vague parody of the ideas behind DUNE except instead of feuding noble houses of quiet dignity or perversity, we have a bunch of spoiled idiots. It has a lot of Buffy-esque quips and fun going on and is a work with both highs as well as lows.

The premise of the series is Earth has been forgotten by a space-dwelling humanity who has settled thousands of worlds using a hyperspace-esque dimension called the Flow. Peace is maintained by the fact all planets are independent on one another, creating the on-the-nose titled Interdependency that is ruled by a holy Emperox (pronounced "Empero"). Unfortunately, the Flow is about to collapse and every single human not living on a viable world is going to die.

Despite this grim premise, the book is absolutely hilarious with the three main characters pathologically unable to take any of their situations seriously. Much of the humor in the book is how they're always snarking at one another. None of them seem especially panicked by the imminent end of humanity and might genuinely just be too selfish to care. Which makes them not at all sympathetic and hurts the pacing of the book a bit as we can only take events as seriously as the heroes (which is to say, not at all).

I can't say I disliked any of the characters either with Kiva being easily my favorite of them. She's a bisexual noblewoman and starship captain who is oversexed, underambitious, and totally the worst person qualified to be the Emperox's biggest ally for saving humanity. Her putting down a mutiny in the start of the book is far from her most entertaining scene (which usually involves seducing one of the cast) but it shows she does know her job. Her mouth is foul, her behavior vulgar, and there's not a single page which would not be improved by her being present.

The closest thing the book has to a "serious" protagonist is Empress Cardenia, who is the illegitimate daughter of the former Emperor. It's through her we discover the various politics and historical details which are the building blocks of the Interdependency and why humanity is probably doomed. Honestly, even she fails to show much emotion about either the end of everything or the discovery (which is not a spoiler) her empire was built on a scam designed to keep her family rich for millennium.

I confess, I'm more than a bit uncomfortable with the fact the Interdependency created a fake religion as part of said scam but I suppose I should be outraged--just more than I suspect the book expected for a bunch of "lovable" rogues. It's just another of the issues where there's something awful done which our characters have a subdued reaction to. This pushes the book a bit over the line from comedy to farce.

John Scalzi does a great job setting up an interesting science fiction problem for our heroes, which is the most valuable resource which all of their civilization depends on is about to go away. The only solution for humanity to survive is to return to a non-space faring civilization by moving as much of humanity to a Earth-like planet as possible. It's a logistical nightmare made worse by the fact it's a one-way trip due to the Flow already collapsing.

The book kind of works at odds to itself, though. Again, billions of people are going to die no matter what happens and humanity as a species is going to lose space travel. This is too dark a subject matter for casual flippancy and it's not the kind of story which really needs a "villain" like the story gives us. The villains have to be idiots to not put aside their ambitions for as long as it takes to guarantee humanity to survive (which is something done in Dawn Chapman's THE SECRET KING to great effect). Given they're portrayed as geniuses, that also warps the narrative.

Overall, I found the book entertaining and will read the sequel. I just more feel this book is Chicken McNuggets rather than a well-prepared steak. It's quite good while you're eating it but doesn't stand up afterward.

Charles Phipps

C.T Phipps is a lifelong student of horror, science fiction, and fantasy. An avid tabletop gamer, he discovered this passion led him to write and turned him into a lifelong geek. He is a regular blogger on "The United Federation of Charles".

He's written Agent G, Cthulhu Armageddon, Lucifer's Star, and The Supervillainy Saga.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.