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Interview with the M.L. Spencer II
01, Dec

 1. Can you tell us what Chains of Blood is about?

Chains of Blood is about a war between the already battle-torn nations of the Rhen and an enemy that is basically a hive mind society that uses mages as weapons that are chained together to amplify their power.

2. What made you decide to write a sequel to the Rhenwars Saga?

Honestly, I wasn’t going to. But I had a whole bunch of fans writing me who wanted to know what would happen to the son of one of the main characters. So I decided that since it seemed a story people wanted to know, I should probably write it.

3. What differentiates the protagonists from the previous ones?

Well, in The Rhenwars Saga, Kyel Archer is the classic “reluctant hero:” a good man who always tries to do what is right and has some sound moral limits.  Darien Lauchlin is a pretty dark and impulsive character who is willing to go to any length to accomplish what he deems necessary. Kyel’s son Gil isn’t like his dad. He’s arrogant and ambitious. He doesn’t have the same personal limits, even though he tries very hard to be a hero like his father. Rylan is Darien’s son and, again, he’s nothing like his father. He is reserved, cautious, and a rather every-day kind of guy.

4. Who are the antagonists in this book?

The bad guys are the Turan Khar, who have a very interesting society. They are all telepathically linked together in a kind of hivemind collective. Their society is actually very beautiful, arguably the highest form of civilization that has ever been achieved. Every individual within it only acts for the good of the whole, never selfishly. The only problem with the Turan Khar is that, if there is a threat to the collective, that threat must be extinguished without any consideration of the consequences.

6. How has the response been to the Rhenwars Saga so far?

The Rhenwars Saga did very well and the feedback on it has been intense. I can’t believe how many people consider it one of their favorite series in all of fantasy. That was actually a little shocking to me.

7. Who is your favorite character in Chains of Blood?

I like Rylan. He’s a very nice guy in a crappy situation, and there’s a lot more to him than meets the eye. Besides, I have some serious plans for him *rubs hands together wickedly.

8. How many books can we expect in this series?

I’m going to try to keep this one to a trilogy.

9. What would you suggest the theme for this series is?

The chains weren’t enough to tip my hat? Lol. Bonds. Bonds of blood, bonds of love, bonds of duty…don’t get me started on the bonds that connect the Khar society.

10. What writing projects do you have coming up?

I have another trilogy in the works. After that, who knows?

Available for purchase here

 

 

SPFBO 2019 - Phase 1 - Sixth Booknest Semifinalist
02, Nov

It has been my great pleasure to once again to have been invited to serve as an SPFBO guest judge by Booknest. My job has been to review five of the thirty books in Booknest's batch, and forward one of them as a semifinalist. And so, without further ado...

This is the second SPFBO I've participated in, and my first as a judge. I'd like to say thanks to Mark Lawrence, Petros, and all the bloggers who make this possible; from this seat, I can better appreciate how much work it is to coordinate and execute the contest. I'd also like to congratulate everyone who entered this year. Putting a book out in the world takes courage, hard work, and grit. Most people will never enter a novel into a book competition; like running a marathon, just making it to the starting line is a personal achievement.

It has been a singular pleasure to participate in this year’s SPFBO and I’d like to thank Mark Lawrence and Petros for the opportunity. I didn’t realize how daunting the task of reading these five books would be, and I certainly don’t envy those reviewers tackling thirty. The reading was easy. It was choosing only one that was difficult.

The Gossamer Globe by Abbie Evans – A fantasy presidential election goes awry. Comedy ensues.

The Winter of Swords by Aaron Bunce – An orphan, a soldier, and a girl must become something more to survive the Winter of Swords.

Throne by Phil Tucker – Two women are chosen to represent two opposing factions of the Fae court.

The Dragonslayer of Edgewhen – Fantasy problems require fantasy solutions in this lighthearted tale of strangers searching for a mysterious Dragonslayer.

 

 

 

 

And finally, my choice for semi-finalist...

 

 

 

Weird Theology by Alex Raizman – An awkward loner becomes a god in this fun and zany tale of divinity, destruction, and dancing.

 

 

I would like to offer additional thanks to Aaron Bunce, Phil Tucker, Jason A. Holt, Aaron Raizman, and the writing duo known as Abbie Evans for the opportunity to read their work and for dragon ton of future success. I’d also like to congratulate Alex Raizman and wish him luck as I turn his story over to the boss.

Welcome to BookNest.eu! Can you tell us a few things about yourself?

Welcome to BookNest.eu! Can you tell us a few things about yourself?

Welcome to BookNest.eu! Can you tell us a few things about yourself?

I'm a fantasy author of five books. Some people agree that they aren't all awful.

Editor’s Note: Your name is known to the booknest.eu hive mind, Graham Austin-King.

What book did you enter SPFBO with, and is it your debut?

I entered with The Lore of Prometheus which is my fifth novel.

Tell us a few things about it. What should the Judge you'll be allocated to, expect from it?

Prometheus is a military/urban fantasy. Imagine Jason Bourne meets X-men.

You'll compete against 299 other books. Do you believe your book will stand out against the competition, and if yes, why?

I think it will. Prometheus is very different to anything I've written before and it's hard to classify into a subgenre which I think probably benefits it. It has a level of humour in it as well, which I think helps any book flow.

WHERE DID YOU HIDE THE MONEY!??!?!

In Dyrk Ashton's pants.

Editor's Note:  You are not the first to level these complaints towards Dyrk. We are taking steps to investigate the matter in full.

Why did you decide to enter SPFBO in the first place?

SPFBO is an amazing opportunity to gain exposure for a novel. Not only have several authors signed major publishing deals as a result of this exposure, but also the stigma of self-publishing is being slowly eroded. The question is why wouldn't I enter?

Are you working on a book right now? What should we expect from you next?

I'm working on the sequel to Faithless right now.

Anything else you would like to add? A message to the other contestants, the Judges, or Mark Lawrence himself?

Good luck everyone!

What is the airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow?

An African or a European swallow?

Editor's Note: Thanks for telling us a little about The Lore of Prometheus, Graham! I know for a fact Lynn loved your book and I myself am looking forward to digging into it later down the line! Good luck in the coming months! 

 

 

The Perilisc Manifesto

 

 

 

Logan Avenue, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Spring, 2011. I’m in my minivan driving tomy sister-in-law’s house. I could tell you why, but I have forgotten that part. There is a man walking on the right sidewalk with a small dog. He is wearing a blue shirt. The car in front of me is a Honda with a faded Green Bay Packers bumper sticker on it. The license plate number, I remember clearly. This is the defining moment in my life. This is when it hits me.

It comes like a bolt, not of lightning, but just as blinding. More like a bolt of knowledge from the sky. I hear a voice say, “I am a terrible writer, but a fantastic storyteller.” The voice is my own. I have said it out loud, as if possessed by the thought and the idea.

I have written four books at this point, had my first book edited and it got crushed. She ripped it to shreds and said, “Yeah, start over.” I am now at a crossroads. This is where it is all decided. 

There are many other paths open to me, things I am good at, things I am interested in. When you get the truth set upon you that you are bad at something, you walk away. That is what you do. But this is the moment my career is born, because instead of shrugging and walking away, my first real thought beyond the bubbling of confusion and pain is, “I have to teach myself to do this. I need to stop trying to get published, and learn what I am doing. I need to admit to myself that no one should have to read what I write yet.” 

I need to get to work. 

I continue to write every day, 3,000 words a day. My one focus: getting better at this job, teaching myself to be a writer, because I know what most writers don’t: No one can teach you how to write a book. They can show you what works for them. They can talk for days, and they do, about outlines and character bios, but in the end, every writer who has made it will tell you that you have to figure it out for yourself. 

I wrote for twelve years before I published anything. Six years of every day, 3,000 words. I learned and I fought and I cried, and I screamed in frustration when I couldn't get it right. With every word I typed and every idea I brought forward, I meticulously crafted one world.

When I pulled off Logan Avenue, I started to put together Perilisc. I wrote five series. All five are standalone series, but when you take them apart and shuffle them together in chronological order, they tell one story. One long story. The story of a boy. The story of Peter Redfist.

My story started at a book called Onslaught of Madness. It is an 870-page epic that begins a war that ravages two nations. It is the beginning, however it is nearly 900 pages long. No one would read that big a book from a first-time author. I decided I had to prove myself before I could ask any reader to read such a thing. In preparation of Onslaught’s release, I set out a plan to do just that. 

I published Liefdom in 2016. I wanted to show to the world I could write a compelling story that was complete, imaginative, and new.

I published Legends of Perilisc in 2016. This is a collection of short stories that tells about the creation of my world and introduces the reader to my style and my subject matter. 

In 2016, I published Chaste, then Mestlven in 2017. These books take place in the same world and each crosses over into the other. I wanted to show the reader I could weave stories through standalone books while sticking to the story of the book as well. Crossovers and unifying threads. 

I began to publish The Manhunters books in 2017. My goal was to prove I could write a series. Prove to the reader I can publish a series in a timely fashion. Make them a promise they would not have to wait for me to come back to my work. 

In 2018, in Blackest Knights, an anthology with a collection of talented writers, I gave the reader the first glimpse of Peter Redfist in a short story called “The Land of Rott and Cur.”

In 2019, amid constant attacks that male writers could not write female characters of power and accuracy, I published Legends of the Exiles to show that my female characters are strong in a variety of different ways, and I can write them with grace and power.

It’s been two books a year, because I can publish every six months. I can do that because for 15 years, I have been writing books. I have a stockpile waiting to see the light of day, books I have been working on for over a decade, books that are already written. 

After proving all this to the attentive reader, I stand now on the precipice of my story, ready to begin. Every book I have published so far leads into this. The Manhunters trilogy, the shorts, Liefdom, Mestlven, and Chaste, they all tie in. I am done proving myself now. I have shown you I can do this job. 

With today’s release, I bring you Peter Redfist. I bring you Perilisc. Today, I take you to The Escape. The one event I have been talking about for three years. The event that defines the age. The critical moment, the B.C./A.D. point of my world. Today my timeline starts to make sense. Today all the pieces begin to fit into place. 

Today, October 5th, 2019 is the beginning of it all. 

Peter has come. As Peter says, “I lead you now into peril.”

Book Links:

  Amazon: mybook.to/Onslaught-Madness-Wars

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/46659201-onslaught-of-madness


 About the Author:

Jesse Teller fell in love with fantasy when he was five years old and played his first game of Dungeons & Dragons. The game gave him the ability to create stories and characters from a young age. He started consuming fantasy in every form and, by nine, was obsessed with the genre. As a young adult, he knew he wanted to make his life about fantasy. From exploring the relationship between man and woman, to studying the qualities of a leader or a tyrant, Jesse Teller uses his stories and settings to study real-world themes and issues.

He lives with his supportive wife, Rebekah, and his two inspiring children, Rayph and Tobin.

 

 

Author Links:

 Website: https://jesseteller.com/

 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PathtoPerilisc/

 Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/jesse.teller/

 Twitter: https://twitter.com/JesseTeller

 Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15269506.Jesse_Teller